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(May 21, 2015) Sabrina Ross, CIPP/US, formerly of Apple, is joining Uber’s privacy team in the midst of the company’s initiative to improve its privacy processes. “At Uber, she’ll specifically work on privacy aspects of regulatory and policy issues. She’ll also be reviewing the privacy practices of Uber’s partnerships with companies like Spotify, Starwood and American Express,” Re/Code reports. Ross will be joining the likes of Chief Security Officer Joe Sullivan and Managing Counsel Katherine Tassi, who previously served as Facebook’s head of data protection. The focus on privacy has, according to an Uber report, resulted in improvements. “Uber has dedicated significantly more resources to privacy than we have observed of other companies of its age, sector and size,” the review said. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

Choosing the Best File-Sharing Option for Your Org

(May 19, 2015) “Not all file-sharing solutions are created equal,” writes HoGo CEO Hiro Kataoka. But, he adds, “Understanding the context in which an organization intends to use file-sharing technology is just the first step. It’s also important to weigh risk against the primary features of both on-premises and cloud-based file-sharing systems.” In this post for Privacy Tech, Kataoka explores the pros and cons of both solutions and describes the coming hybridization and the promise it will hold for protecting and sharing valuable enterprise data. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

System Aims To Produce Fake Passwords In Hacked Databases

(May 19, 2015) Researchers have created a data protection system that would make it more difficult for hackers to obtain passwords from leaked databases, CIO reports. In a research paper submitted for consideration at the 2015 Annual Computer Security Applications Conference, the team of researchers unveiled ErsatzPasswords, which misleads hackers using brute force attacks to unlock hashed passwords. Purdue University’s Mohammed Almeshelkah said adversaries “will still be able to crack that file; however, the passwords they will get back are fake passwords or decoy passwords.” ErsatzPasswords adds an additional step to passwords when they are encrypted, making it impossible to restore them to the original plain-text form. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

Software Firm Introduces Next Generation VoIP Solution

(May 19, 2015) TechRepublic reports on Ring, the next generation of the SFLphone project produced by Canadian-based open-source software firm Savoir-faire Linux aimed at giving users a secure VoIP solution. “Ring uses OpenDHT to connect users instead of a centralized SIP server system such as Asterisk,” the report states, which allows Ring “to bypass the server-client methodology by passing along user information to each other.” There’s a growing need for secure communications and “existing solutions are not secure,” the report states, noting services such as Skype and its competitor WhatsApp received poor scores in the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Secure Messaging Scorecard. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

How One Social Network Built In Privacy by Design

(May 18, 2015) In a product review, Think Privacy CEO Alexander Hanff discusses a new social networking site called the Krowd and how it has embraced and built in the principles of Privacy by Design to its services. Distinct from other social sites, Hanff explains, the Krowd runs on local networks where users can create various personas depending on the context of a given social situation. “You can define the Krowd as a dynamic, app-based social network limited to a specific location such as a conference, baseball game or university campus,” Hanff writes. In this post for Privacy Tech, Hanff describes how this new service works and the potential it could have for users seeking social connection with control. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

Roundup: South Africa, EU, U.S. and More

(May 18, 2015) In the EU, France’s new antiterrorism law has some wondering whether it’s within the confines of EU law; Belgium is making the case for its authority to regulate Facebook, and Italy’s general resolution on online profiling activities is now in force. South Africa has new regulations for drone operators, and Australia’s privacy commissioner just got an extra $4.2M to deal with the new data retention law. Also in this week’s Privacy Tracker weekly legislative roundup, read about proposals at the U.S. federal level and new laws in states, including Georgia’s student privacy law, New Jersey’s limitations on vehicle event-recorder data and Maryland’s new social media law for higher education institutions. (IAPP member login required.) Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

Ray: Law Profession Getting Smart on Privacy as a Differentiator

(May 18, 2015) In an article for The Global Legal Post, David Ray, CIPT, of the Huron Consulting Group, discusses the efforts law departments, law firms and other service providers are making to protect sensitive and confidential data. Because the legal professional by nature deals with large amounts of sensitive data, data privacy is becoming increasingly more important. Ray says legal departments are getting wise on privacy issues and putting the governance practices of their suppliers under much greater scrutiny. He also says firms are starting to see an ability to deal with sensitive information responsibly as a business opportunity rather than a threat. Legal vendors, meanwhile, “are playing catch-up” and “need to rise to the same challenge.  Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

Monitoring Your Privacy Program: Part Four

(May 15, 2015) In the fourth part of this series for The Privacy Advisor on how to best monitor your privacy program, Deidre Rodriguez, CIPP/US, zooms in on the finance industry with Zoe Strickland, CIPP/G, CIPP/US, CIPT, chief privacy officer at JPMorgan Chase and recent keynote speaker at the IAPP Asia Privacy Forum. Strickland discusses where to start on building a monitoring program; documenting the programs “in official repositories, provided to appropriate leadership for review/approval and tracked to completion for action items,” and focusing on top risks, among other essential steps privacy pros should take. “We all know privacy can be a 24-7 operation, and an effective program needs to deploy resources effectively,” Strickland says. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

Frick: Data Tracking Paints a Pretty—Not Fretful—Picture

(May 15, 2015) The use of data for art can take the sting out of “Big Brother,” data artist Laurie Frick argues. Frick, who uses information gleaned from apps and personal journals to create her works and was artist-in-residence at the recent IAPP Global Privacy Summit, is among a rising coterie of artists who see data as a “metaphor for the human experience,” or more specifically, according to Frick, “an essential idea of who we are.” She tells The Atlantic, “I think people are at a point where they are sick of worrying about who is or isn’t tracking their data. I say, run toward the data. Take your data back and turn it into something meaningful.”   Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

Notes from the IAPP Canada Managing Director, May 15, 2015

(May 15, 2015) I don’t think Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien received the warmest of welcomes from the privacy industry when he was first appointed. There was some criticism and a bit of surprise that a newcomer to the privacy scene was chosen. There was some suggestion that because Commissioner Therrien was coming from the public safety portfolio within the government that maybe, as a result, he’d be less critical of big brother-type files or legislation. Well, in my mind, he put those criticisms to rest... Read More

Canada Dashboard Digest