ACI_Q2_Ads_battletested-728x90
ACI_Q2_Ads_successful-728x90
BNA_15349_Privacy_Law_Asia_wp_ad_680x75_Ldbd
PrivacyTraining_ad300x250.Promo1-01
TRUSTe_Webcon_TE_300x250_ad_June_2015-01
DPC15_300x250_ads_FINAL

(Jul 7, 2015) Statistically speaking, flying is the safest way to travel. That’s due to intensive, holistic and precise safety-critical methods employed by the aviation industry. In fact, many other industries have taken up the aviation industry’s safety theories, including the civil engineering, nuclear and medical fields. In this post for Privacy Tech, privacy engineer Ian Oliver explains how such methodology could be applied to the privacy profession. Instead of simply relying on data breach prevention, for example, the profession should consider a more holistic view and treat personal information as a safety-critical aspect, Oliver writes. Read More

Daily Dashboard

Hacking Team Leak Indicates FBI Dealings, TOR Circumvention

(Jul 7, 2015) A 400 gigabyte online “document dump” of data stolen from spyware organization Hacking Team highlights the technology developer’s alleged dealings with the FBI and other groups, Ars Technica reports. One of the hacked spreadsheets indicates the FBI has paid Hacking Team more than $773,226 since 2011 “for services related to the Hacking Team product known as ‘Remote Control Service,’ which is also marketed under the name ‘Galileo,’” the report states. Another document discusses Hacking Team’s abi... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Code Specialists Warn U.S., UK on Risks To Accessing Encrypted Data

(Jul 7, 2015) An elite group of code makers and code breakers says in a new paper there is no viable technical solution that would allow American and British governments to gain “exceptional access” to encrypted communications without putting the world’s most confidential data and critical infrastructure in danger. The New York Times reports the 13 cryptographers, computer scientists and security specialists will release the report today, a day before FBI Director James Comey Jr. and Sally Quillian Yates of t... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Chorus Against ICANN Anti-Piracy Proposal Grows

(Jul 7, 2015) There is growing opposition from women’s rights and privacy advocacy groups to an Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) proposal aimed at combating online piracy, BuzzFeed News reports. On Tuesday, a coalition—including celebrities and academics—sent ICANN a letter protesting the proposal that would require website operators to reveal users’ personal information. The letter argues the move will “physically endanger many domain owners and disproportionately impac... Read More

Daily Dashboard

OPM’s Esser: Agency’s New Hires Won’t Solve the Problem

(Jul 7, 2015) The Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM) internal watchdog believes the organization’s move to hire an additional four senior IT managers is "a potential boondoggle,” NextGov reports. Assistant Inspector General Michael Esser testified at a congressional hearing last month that the agency has not estimated the total time or money required for such an undertaking. While OPM estimates the project to cost $94 million, Esser said that doesn’t include the expense of transitioning over existing applications, the report states. The new hires would be responsible for migrating the agency’s decades-old computer systems to a new network. Read More

Daily Dashboard

Group Wants Right To Be Forgotten for U.S.; Cosby Docs Unsealed

(Jul 7, 2015) Consumer Watchdog is filing a formal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) arguing that, by not providing Americans with the same right-to-be-forgotten measures existent in the EU, Google is exercising an unfair and deceptive trade practice, The Washington Post reports. In the complaint, the group urges the FTC to “investigate and act.” Consumer Watchdog Privacy Project Director John Simpson said, “Google holds itself out as so concerned about users’ privacy, but denies fundamental p... Read More

Daily Dashboard

UK ICO Approves CA Technologies for BCRs

(Jul 7, 2015) New York City-based CA Technologies has received approval of its binding corporate rules (BCRs) from UK Information Commissioner Christopher Graham. “Being one of the first technology companies to receive approval for our BCR is an incredible achievement and one that demonstrates that CA not only creates secure solutions but also implements the highest level of data privacy and protection as a matter of company policy,” said CA Technologies General Counsel Michael Bisignano. CA Technologies joins a growing list of companies choosing BCRs as a data-transfer mechanism. Read More

Daily Dashboard

Senate Intelligence Committee To Push Bill for Site Reporting

(Jul 7, 2015) Within the next week, the Senate Intelligence Committee will file a bill mandating that if an “electronic communication service provider” has knowledge of terrorist activity on its site, it must report the activity to authorities, The Washington Post reports. The bill has already catalyzed privacy and First Amendment concerns. “Considering the vast majority of people on these sites are not doing anything wrong, this type of monitoring would be considered by many to be an invasion of privacy. It ... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Chamber of Commerce Backs Google, Viacom in Nick.com Suit

(Jul 7, 2015) The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is siding with Google and Viacom in asking an appellate court to throw out a lawsuit accusing the companies of violating a federal privacy law by using tracking cookies on children’s website Nick.com. The chamber says the lawsuit “aims to change the predominant functional construct of the Internet,” MediaPost reports. The chamber claims U.S. District Court Judge Stanley Chesler, who found data stored in cookies isn’t personally identifiable, correctly threw out the case last year. Plaintiffs in the case appealed the ruling to the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals arguing Google can identify them by combining cookie-based data with other information, the report states. Read More

Daily Dashboard

Study: Users Don’t Totally Grasp IoT, But They Know Their Data Is Being Sold

(Jul 7, 2015) An Altimeter Group study discovered that while 87 percent of consumers are unsure of what the Internet of Things is, exactly, they have a fundamental understanding of “the data implications of fitness trackers, connected cars or connected home appliances. And most don’t like it,” Fortune reports, adding that consumers’ chief concern is having their data sold. Jessica Groopman, who conducted the research, said, “It’s clear that there’s a communication and consent gap today. It isn’t smart for companies to move forward ruthlessly and relentlessly. It should be a bit more of a joint effort where companies educate consumers and get their opt in.” Read More

Daily Dashboard