ACI_Q2_Ads_disaster-728x90
ACI_Q2_Ads_successful-728x90
ACI_Q2_Ads_battletested-728x90
PrivacyTraining_ad300x250.Promo1-01

PPC_CIPM_300x250.FINAL-01

(May 26, 2015) A $19 million settlement between Target and MasterCard has been terminated, Reuters reports. The deal was originally announced in April and would have provided compensation to banks and credit unions that sued over Target’s breach, but the settlement fell through because not enough banks accepted the deal. In their suit, lawyers argued that the deal with MasterCard “was an attempt to undercut their claims for damages,” the report states. Plaintiffs’ lawyers said, “We are pleased that financial institutions have resoundingly rejected Target and MasterCard’s attempt to avoid fully reimbursing the losses suffered during one of the largest data breaches in U.S. history.” Read More

Daily Dashboard

Roundup: Germany, South Africa, Belgium, U.S. and More

(May 26, 2015) The latest proposed draft of Germany’s data retention legislation includes a provision for keeping the data in Germany, which some say may not sit well with U.S. tech firms. Meanwhile, Belgium has written a lengthy recommendation stating why it should be regulating Facebook, and EU ambassadors have agreed to a proposal that would create three levels of fines for violations of the data protection overhaul. Also in this week’s Privacy Tracker weekly legislative roundup, South Africa is taking steps to appoint an information regulator and newly proposed drone regulations may conflict with business uses, and you can read about updates on the 21st Century Cures bill, PCLOB and the USA PATRIOT Act as well as state actions in the U.S. (IAPP member login required.) Read More

Daily Dashboard

Facebook in Focus of EU Regulators

(May 26, 2015) Now that Belgium has teamed with French, Spanish, German and Dutch regulators to zero in on Facebook’s cookie use, and Facebook has responded by calling for a single point of regulation in the EU, The New York Times and other news organizations are noticing that the world of regulation in the EU is becoming quite complicated. “The debate,” the report states, “is whether individuals’ privacy should be protected primarily by their domestic regulators or by the watchdog in the country where a compa... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Bad Guys Having a Field Day with Recent Breaches

(May 26, 2015) Brian Krebs reports on the underworld activity sparked by recent leaks of personal data from databases at Adult Friend Finder and mSpy. Rather than cash in via using stolen credentials, the play appears to be extortion and blackmail. With mSpy, a user’s iTunes username and password are necessary to load the program. Now, those who have access to the leaked credentials are remotely locking phones and “the only way to get their data back is to pay a ransom.” Similarly, while Adult Friend Finder di... Read More

Daily Dashboard

To Hackers, Children’s PI Is Most Valuable

(May 26, 2015) The Hill reports that “no personal information is more valuable to cyber criminals than a child’s,” noting while adults are often most concerned about their financial information when breaches occur, “it’s their kids’ identities they should be worried about, experts say.” According to the Federal Trade Commission, “A child's Social Security number can be used by identity thieves to apply for government benefits, open bank and credit card accounts, apply for a loan or utility service or rent a place to live.” Separately, researcher danah boyd looks into the questions around protecting students’ privacy in the context of myriad legislation being proposed in the U.S. Read More

Daily Dashboard

IoT-Connected Toy Patents Generate “Creepy” Tag

(May 26, 2015) A newly published patent detailing plans by Google for Internet-connected toys has generated concerns, CNBC reports. Such products would act as an “anthropomorphic device” in the form of a “doll or toy that resembles a human, an animal, a mythical creature or an inanimate object,” the patent states. One would be a teddy bear that could control Internet-of-Things devices within the home through voice command or gestures. A spokesperson for Big Brother Watch described “the creepiness of the produc... Read More

Daily Dashboard

The Privacy Balance: One Mayor’s Struggle

(May 26, 2015) In a Q&A with Ars Technica, Oakland, CA, Mayor Libby Schaaf discusses the balance between privacy and surveillance. “It’s really frustrating,” she explains. “On one hand we have an obligation to use tools that can save lives, can create safety, can prevent harm. And yet at the same time we have an obligation to respect and protect the privacy of the people who live here. And we are not doing a good job of reconciling those two needs.” To accomplish that task, she says, the city needs its “brilliant minds” to step up and help and “not just say no, but help us say how, when, why and where.” Read More

Daily Dashboard

Congress Scrambles Over Holiday To Pursue Surveillance Law Updates

(May 26, 2015) The New York Times reports senior lawmakers are scrambling in rare recess talks to negotiate changes to the National Security Agency’s (NSA) bulk telephony surveillance program. Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) said calls over the holiday break should help broker an agreement on changes to the USA FREEDOM Act. Currently, three senators are needed to garner enough votes to pass the legislation, which has already passed the House of Representatives. “That is the goal: Work it out over the break,” he said. ... Read More

Daily Dashboard

EDPS Says App Developers Should Hold Greater Privacy Responsibility

(May 26, 2015) European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) Giovanni Buttarelli has said developers of so-called m-health tracking apps have a higher responsibility to protect the sensitive data collected about users of such apps, Out-law.com reports. In an 18-page paper on the subject, he noted that EU lawmakers should “foster accountability and allocation of responsibility of those involved in the design, supply and functioning of apps” and that “all actors guarantee confidentiality, integrity and availability... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Researchers: “Leaky” Bluetooth Tech a Privacy Risk

(May 26, 2015) Many fitness trackers and smartphones use Bluetooth Low Energy technology (BLE) to communicate back and forth or with beacons in the environment. Some 90 percent of devices may use the tech by 2018. But, reports V3, researchers at security firm Context have found they can track specific devices using BLE within 100 meters. “The information could be used for social engineering as part of a planned cyber attack or for physical crime by knowing people’s movements,” Context’s Scott Lester said. Context has even created an app that scans, detects and logs wearable devices using BLE to show how easy it is to track the signals. Read More

Daily Dashboard